Family

Are You a Family Caregiver? Who Will Take Care of You?

Family Caregivers

If men are the “bread winners” of a family, then it’s the women who are the backbone. At least that’s always been true in my family. My dad would bring home a bigger paycheck but my mom would be the one to stretch the last dollar to feed and cloth five children. The same goes for my grandmother, my great grandmother and her mother before her. They could take care of sick kids and husbands while being sick themselves. At 86, my great grandmother is still taking care of everyone. If she isn’t on her porch swing bouncing a baby, you will find her in the vegetable garden or at the stove canning vegetables and sending them home with anyone who could use them. She took care of her mother until she passed away at 93 years of age. Then she took care of my grandfather and proceeded to outlive him as well as two of her children.

Information for this post is sourced from Genworth Financial in partnership with the SheHeard Influencer Network.

According to a recent article by the Huffington Post, caregiving by a family member is a rapidly growing experience. There are about 42.1 million family caregivers in the United States (most of them women ages 40 to 60).

I can’t help but think, who will take care of my grandmother and the other women like her? As I watch her shoulders droop with age and hard work, as I watch her memory begin to fail her, I can’t help but think that even the strongest steel bends. My family is lucky. There are many of us who are willing and able to set aside time in our busy schedules to make sure she is cared for. But not all women are so lucky. They’re outliving their spouses and their children, leaving no one left to care for them. This is why it’s so important for children and parents to have that discussion now. Genworth has a great article featuring 7 things you should be discussing now.

With so much uncertainty in the world today, making sure you discuss this often overlooked topic with those you care about is well worth doing. Like having an emergency evacuation plan, you’ll thank yourselves and each other later.

Ashley

Ashley

Ashley spends her days avoiding run-ons as she turns words from yellow to chartreuse and wearing out the M & N keys writing about Travel, DIY, and Tech. She hopes to inspire the masses to travel and LIVE happily one InstaTweetPin at a time.

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11 Comments

  1. September 18, 2013 at 5:49 pm — Reply

    This is such an important topic and one that we all need to figure out and discuss with our families. In my own family it happened twice that the caregiver passed suddenly with no plan for moving forward.

  2. September 18, 2013 at 5:17 pm — Reply

    Very true about more women being caregivers. I’m one of them who is in the sandwich generation. It can be very difficult since I’m the only one nearby.

  3. September 18, 2013 at 5:47 am — Reply

    Honestly, this is something that I hadn’t really thought much about yet…. for myself or my parents. I should though.

  4. September 17, 2013 at 6:59 pm — Reply

    I agree that it can feel incredibly awkward to talk about this but it’s essential!

  5. September 17, 2013 at 5:55 pm — Reply

    It’s always hard to plan for the things we don’t even want to think about, but it’s so necessary. I know that my husband and I would be the caregiver for my parents if anything were to happen.

  6. September 17, 2013 at 5:41 pm — Reply

    Very important to look ahead and plan for this. At the moment I’m working on building my life so that I can best assist my loved ones, and, when it comes time, have things in place for myself too.

  7. September 17, 2013 at 4:31 pm — Reply

    This is definitely something I need to look into! Thank you for the information.

  8. September 17, 2013 at 2:01 pm — Reply

    It’s so important to plan for the future. My parents on both sides have no retirement plan, I’m afraid I’m it.

  9. Jake
    September 17, 2013 at 12:55 pm — Reply

    My grandparents are both in their 80’s, while they’re healthy now my parents have started discussing living arrangements should either of them become too disabled to care for themselves or each other. It’s a hard conversation, but an important conversation.

  10. September 17, 2013 at 11:38 am — Reply

    I love this for it’s a reminder as to what I need to get to doing now so I am not having my kids or other family members worry later.

  11. September 17, 2013 at 11:35 am — Reply

    I definitely need to look into something like this. If something were to happen to either of my parents, I would definitely take care of the other.

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