Parenting: Text Messaging Acronyms and Apps You Should Know

Tech trends are known for shifting in the wind but there is no user group more fickle than those of the under 18 crowd. These days SMS is quickly becoming a thing of the past in lieu of social messaging apps. Depending on what they want to say teens are choosing a handful of apps to fit their needs. If they don’t want a message to hang around, they’ll use a temporary app such as Snapchat while Yik Yak offers anonymity and Kik offers a mixture of the two.

Must Know Text Messaging Acronyms and Shorthand

PAP – Post a picture
143 – I love you
Netflix and chill – Code for hooking up or a “booty call”
CD9 aka Code 9 – Code for parents are around
AF – Acronym “as f**k” used to express the severity of something (ie hot AF)
GNOC – Get Naked On Cam
OP – Original Poster
Likers get rate – This means the original poster will “rank” anyone who interacts with the post by rating them on looks/how cool they appear.

Kik

Kik Messenger is trending for a number of reasons. It allows users to send private messages that their parents can’t see. It offers the false sense of security of anonymity thru usernames and allows users to send text, pictures and video. But there’s more to Kik than meets the eye. In addition to unlimited text; you get ‘read’ receipts; can send individual group messages; surf the Web; and you access contents from within the app. Another concerning feature is that Kik allows users to search for people based on things like age and gender.

SnapChat

SnapChat has been growing exponentially lately especially within the teen demographic. It’s an app that was designed to make messages brief. Users can view the message for a limited amount of time before it disappears from the screen. However, a simple screenshot freezes that snap permanently to a user’s camera roll – something teens and adults learned very quickly upon release of the app.

YikYak

Yik Yak is set up like a mixture of Twitter and Tinder. Like Twitter, it’s a free app that lets users post brief comments. Like Tinder, it’s geographically based. The comments are shown to 500 of the nearest Yik-Yak users (within a 1.5 mile radius). Kids are using it to share opinions, rumors, secrets, and gossip. 

It’s important to discuss which messaging apps your teens are using and to establish an open dialogue about all things mobile safety. The web can be a scary place but proper dialogue, the right amount of parental advisory and staying “in the know” goes a long way to keeping our kids safe. 

Surf and Sunshine is a member of the #VZWBuzz Lifestyle Blogger program. All opinions remain our own.

34 thoughts on “Parenting: Text Messaging Acronyms and Apps You Should Know”

  1. The only app I know from this list is Snapchat. I only recently started using it and it’s a fun app for sure. One thing I don’t like about it is that a see way too many people using this app while they are driving and that just scares the crap out of me.

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  2. So many popular social media apps available to download. I haven’t tried Snapchat yet. Sounds pretty interesting

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  3. This makes me feel old! I had no idea some of these “code words”. I’ll definitely be keeping my eye out for these on my teens phones.

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  4. These are very important for parents to know. Kids can get in trouble and don’t know all the dangers online. Thank you for sharing.

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  5. Thanks for the info! I’ve never heard of Kik. It does seem kind of scary that teens will share so freely online.

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  6. soo… I only knew about half of those acronyms! its probably a good thing I don’t have kids because I live in a little text free bubble :S

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  7. This is a great post. I think it’s very important to know about apps. Those codes are always extremely important to know. I know a lot of them, so I’m ready when my girls start to get their own phones/computers.

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  8. Parents should know these acronyms that teens use these days. You know, it’s also for protection. :)

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  9. This is an awesome post indeed for parents. It is important for parents to know what the kids are using now days. I didn’t even know there were apps out there like this that the kids today are using. I will have to share this post with my friends who are parents. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. This is good to know for parents with kids that spend a lot of time chatting on their phones or online.

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  11. My kids use all of these apps! I don’t know how to keep up with them myself. I do use Snapchat sometimes, but I’m not very good at it! lol
    The acronyms are very helpful! I’m going to use them with my daughter. ;)

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  12. Our kids have SnapChat, but they share it with us. I hate Yik Yak and I’m kinda scared of it. My kids are not allowed to have it.

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  13. This is such a great post. I have a tween now and they are getting into texting and all that. This is very helpful info.

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  14. Man,I can’t even keep up with the language of kids now days. I don’t have kids, but when I do someday they are NOT getting smart phones or tablets with internet access until their adults. I’ve seen too many issues with it with friends and their kids-even when parental controls are set they’ve worked around them to see things they shouldn’t.

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  15. OMG! I am so not looking forward to teenage years with my kids….ugh. Thanks for sharing hopefully in the next 5 years there won’t be even more.

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  16. OMG. It scares the bejeesus out of me that I need to know things like this. Ugh. Someone make my kids stop growing.

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  17. I’ll be completely honest with you my son probably will not have any of these. There is way too much out there that is so unsafe. Most likely he will have a regular text messages that I will be monitoring when he gets older.

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  18. I knew a few of the acronyms you posted but the rest were new to me. All these new apps make it more difficult to monitor what your child is doing nowadays.

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  19. There are just too many apps out there that kids can use. It’s terrifying, yes, but with proper education, it’s going to be okay. I love how detailed this post is, it will definitely help a lot of parents be familiar with the apps that our kids use.

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  20. I’m definitely new to those apps and those acronyms. I agree that it’s important to have open dialogue about these things with the kids.

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  21. I’ve learned of the CD9 text code from our 18 year old son, but not the PAP, Netflix and chill. These codes are almost humorous, aren’t they (whoever invented them!)? Thanks for sharing!

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  22. Parents really do have to be more hyper aware of what their kids are doing online, especially with the rise of cyberbullying. Plus, teens don’t really understand that just because the message is private or had been deleted, it can still exist somewhere.

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  23. I felt like until recently that I really knew all the new apps and was very in-tuned with technology, but I have been proven wrong. I do not look forward to handling these issues in the teenage years!

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  24. Wow! What a seriously informative post! I read it twice, to be sure I can remember these! I can’t believe I didn’t know some of them, and think every mom should read this!!

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  25. Since when is “Netflix and chill” short for a booty call?! AND why in the heck is there an acronym for Get Naked On Cam — if you want me to get naked, you can at least type a full dang sentence. Thanks for sharing this, the older I get, the more “out of the loop” I get.

    Reply

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